Industry News from Cloud IT

The Value of Cloud Prompts Better Use of Survey Data

May 06, 2016

A recent report from Forbes took a familiar idea and used it to advance something completely new and different. It's well-known that nothing can really be managed without data, and that's led to a lot of new survey data for enterprise cloud computing use. There's so much data on hand now that, according to the report, it's possible to take that data and turn it into a general look at the industry.


That general look is revealing some very unexpected points. For one, better than half of all enterprises, based on the reports, regard cloud as a part of operations so substantial that it requires at least 50 percent of IT budgeting. Cloud use is now seen in several facets of everyday operations, from accounting to customer relationship management (CRM) and beyond.

Businesses putting cloud tools to use most often are also most likely to be seen in other sectors, ranging from mobility as well as data analytics and social media operations. With extensive cloud use comes several visible benefits, including a better business model complete with better productivity, the rise of analytics to deliver actionable insights into current operations that often produce cost savings or new opportunities, and the use of cloud for software development.

The hybrid cloud is currently in an increasing use pattern, with an adoption rate of about 65 to 70 percent, and many clouds are taking on specific focuses, like healthcare tools for a particular area. Several larger enterprises are seen using multiple clouds, with an average of six in both public and private clouds in use.

Better yet, security is improving, and rapidly. While security was once the main roadblock to cloud adoption, it's now lack of resources and expertise that's the number one concern. A large number of surveyed respondents note that security is now the biggest reason to not using more cloud-based systems. Previously, it was a reason to stay out altogether.

There's a lot that can be taken from a study like this. For example, there are still clear opportunities in cloud security provision; it's not the fatal flaw it once was, but it's still making a lot of companies gun-shy. Second, the lack of resources and expertise suggests that consulting may have an opening back into the field, and potentially, those who can develop automated systems that act as surrogates for expertise may be able to find some potentially eager buyers. With a larger portion of budgets going to IT and to cloud therein, it's a clear opportunity for potential suppliers to find buyers as well.

There's a lot to know about the cloud, and plenty yet we still don't understand even with all the data at hand. It's representing a lot of opportunity, though, so it's something businesses sorely need to watch out for. Whether using it or supplying for it, the cloud is already shaking up a lot of the field.



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